Goetz Collection

Oberföhringer Straße 103
81925 Munich
Germany

Tel. +49 (0)89 9593969-0
Fax. +49 (0)89 9593969-69

info@sammlung-goetz.de

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Please select an appointment on our login page. The appointment time indicates the span for your entry but not the duration of your stay. Further information on tours and our special events can be found here.


Größere Kartenansicht

Take the Subway U4 to "Richard-Strauss-Straße". Change here for bus # 188 (direction Unterföhring, Fichtenstraße) to bus stop "Bürgerpark Oberföhring".

Take the streetcar # 16 or # 18, or bus # 54 or # 154 to "Herkomerplatz". Change here for bus # 188 (direction Unterföhring, Fichtenstraße) to bus stop "Bürgerpark Oberföhring".

Individual timetable information:
http://www.mvv-muenchen.de/static_languages/en/home/index.html

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Treffer
Art from the UK
1997 & 1998 | Goetz Collection

Part 1: Douglas Gordon, Mona Hatoum, Abigail Lane, Rachel Whiteread
10/27/1997–02/28/1998
Part 2: Angela Bulloch, Willie Doherty, Tracey Emin, Sarah Lucas, Sam Taylor Wood
03/30–08/02/1998

"When one takes a closer look at British art of the 1990s and subtracts the unnecessary hype surrounding it, these artists demonstrate a sensitivity and sophistication, almost a shameless audacity in their imaginative and direct confrontation with the three main themes concerning humanity – life, death and sex – that does complete justice to them and their reputation."
Gilda Williams

At the end of the 1980s, an exciting new art scene developed in London against the backdrop of the pop culture. With their daring, offensive and direct imagery, they focused on basic socio-political questions of sexuality, identity, power, oppression and exclusion. In 1988, Damien Hirst presented the legendary exhibition Freeze in an empty warehouse in the London Docklands area, thereby founding the myth of the 'Young British Artists'. Their subsequent success on the art market was due to the commitment of advertising mogul Charles Saatchi, who visited the exhibition and began to collect works by the still young artists. In 1997, he displayed them in the exhibition Sensation in the Royal Academy in London.

Ingvild Goetz followed the development of the British art scene with great interest. Her collection contains key works of the 'Young British Artists' such as Smoking Room, 1997, by Sarah Lukas, Untitled (Concave and Convex Beds), 1992 by Rachel Whiteread or Why I Never Became a Dancer, 1995, by Tracey Emin. The two-part exhibition Art from the UK presents installations, films, photographs and works on paper from the 1990s by nine British artists from the collection holdings.

Angela Bulloch, Willie Doherty, Tracey Emin, Douglas Gordon, Mona Hatoum, Abigail Lane, Sarah Lucas, Sam Taylor-Wood, Rachel Whiteread